Arborist’s Report about Library Heritage Oaks Released

This report was released June 15, 2010 to The Mountain Enterprise from Nanette True, Contracts Division for the County of Kern, Construction Services Division (661-868-3044). This is the original document, unabridged.

General Tree Service
4811 Kimber Ave ~ Bakersfield CA 93304 – Kern
Phone (661) 323-3155 ~ Fax (661) 323-2218
Certified Arborist- WE – 6624A

May 19, 2010

Frazier Park Branch Library
Kern County

Re: Tree Evaluation
Attn: Matt Pontes

Purpose and use of this report:

The purpose and use of this report is to assess the current condition and damage of Blue Oak trees located at the Frazier Park Branch Library where construction is occurring.

Observations from walking inspection – grade around tree trunk areas has been changed substantially. Other areas the grade has been raised. Major anchor roots have been severed. Many roots are now exposed and causing desiccation.

Tree #1
Blue Oak – 60 inch caliper
The health condition of this tree is poor.
Lower trunk has 34 inch cavity and substantial root loss from construction activity. The tree is leaning with very little anchorage to support it. Grade has been reduced 42 inches from construction activity.
Recommendation – Removal, unsafe situation of no support system to anchor tree
Tree #2
Blue Oak – 31 inch caliper
Health condition is fair.
Grade has been reduced 42 inches from construction activity. The tree has a slight lean. Also, the Oak has substantial root loss due to construction.
Recommendation – Removal, unsafe situation of no support system to anchor tree

Tree #3
Blue Oak – 59 inch caliper
Health condition is good.
Some roots have been removed to install a V-gutter.
Recommendation – Leave Oak as is.

Tree #4
Blue Oak – Caliper 67 inches
Health condition is fair.
The soil has been compacted around trunk area. Lower trunk area has been damaged by construction.
Recommendation – Aerate soil and remove soil from trunk area to heal wound. Oak tree can fail due to soil compaction and lower trunk injury.

Summary Conclusion

In viewing all Oaks, there has been substantial damage to these trees during construction. Trees #1 & #2 should be removed due to potential liability. Tree #3 is healthy and stable. Very little damage has been done to this Oak tree. Tree #4 has surrounding soil that has been compacted and lower trunk area has been damaged due to construction. This can cause dieback in future years to come. Soil should be aerated to allow air and water access to root system.

Anytime construction is to be done near or around trees, a tree fence should be installed around the drip line to protect root systems. Also, apply mulch around drip line during construction to stop desiccation.

Conway Lopez
Certified Arborist WE – 6624A

 

This is part of the October 17, 2014 online edition of The Mountain Enterprise.

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